Skip Navigation
 1.877.324.6386 1.802.864.1848

 Français
LAKE WEATHER
Get Details
 39°
   
Donate to ECHO

 

           
HOME / VISITORS / PRESS ROOM / MEDIA RELEASE ARCHIVE / RELEASE

RETURN TO MEDIA RELEASE ARCHIVE


VISITORS

+

HOURS &
ADMISSION
+ DAILY SCHEDULE
+ DIRECTIONS
+ FOOD &
BEVERAGES
+ GIFT SHOP
+ ABOUT ECHO
+ GROUP TOURS
+ FACILITY RENTAL
- PRESS ROOM

Media Release
Archive

Photos

Audio & Video
Archive

NEW FROM
THE ECHO BLOG

THE MAKINGS OF A BEAUTIFUL FRIENDSHIP

POSTED MARCH 27 AT 5:00 PM

As the AmeriCorps member here at ECHO I have the privilege…

READ MORE +

FOR IMMEDIATE
RELEASE

 

Steven Leibman
ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center
802-864-1848 ext. 125
sleibman@echovermont.org

Grace PerLee
ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center
802-864-1848 ext. 131
gperlee@echovermont.org

Downloadable images
 

 

TOUCH THE PAST WITH "DINOSAUR DISCOVERIES"
 
Unique Prehistoric Collection At ECHO May 19 - September 3

BURLINGTON, Vt -- Ever had the urge to touch a real dinosaur egg, or to look a Velociraptor in the eye? Head to ECHO this summer and you'll finally get your chance with "Dinosaur Discoveries," running May 19 - September 3, sponsored by Merchants Bank.

This special exhibit is an original compilation of some of the premier prehistoric finds from around the globe, featuring touchable, real dinosaur eggs, nests, and bones, plus giant skeletons, animatronics, and sculptures of the "grown-up" beasts. Phelan Fretz, ECHO's executive director, spent years designing paleontology exhibits and brings this unique collection to Vermont. Says Fretz: "It was truly exciting to create this exhibit for ECHO, because the space lends itself so well to large-scale works. With giant dinosaurs showcased against the backdrop of our soaring ceilings and three-story waterfall - it's like ECHO has been taken back in time to prehistory."

Highlights of "Dinosaur Discoveries":

  • The actual Velociraptor sculpture from "Jurassic Park," to compare with a life-size skeleton.
  • "Baby Louie," the fossil of a dinosaur embryo discovered in 1993; featured on the cover of National Geographic.
  • A mammoth Pterosaur - displayed diving from the ECHO rafters. This prehistoric reptile resembles a platypus crossed with a crocodile; its wings spanning forty feet across.
  • Monolauphosaurus, a twenty foot meat-eater with menacing three-inch-long teeth, and Stegosaurus, with his diamond-shaped ridge bones and plant-grinding molars.
  • Animatronics including an Oviraptor, a Protoceratops, and a Saurolophus.
  • Large prints of dinosaur-themed works by renowned artists and photographers, highlighted by Louis Psihoyos and Dennis Wilson, whose artistry has chronicled prehistoric finds of the past twenty years.
  • Real, touchable dinosaur eggs, bones, and nests; fossilized and preserved over millions of years.

 

"Dinosaur Discoveries" includes pieces from several renowned exhibits, including "Dinosaurs of Jurassic Park: The Lost World" and "Chinasaurs" - both curated by "Dino" Don Lessem, author of over forty paleontology books. Starring in the exhibit are the eggs, nests, and bones of "Hatching the Past," the world-famous collection of Florence and Charlie Magovern. "Baby Louie" - the almost fully-intact Therizinosaur embryo - was discovered by Charlie Magovern in 1993, and took the scientific world by storm.

Prehistoric eggs and embryos are cherished within the paleontology community - the information they contain about dinosaur behavior and evolution has taken research forward by leaps and bounds. It used to be a widely held belief that all dinosaurs were cold-blooded, and that their offspring raised themselves once hatched. We now know - largely through the study of nests, eggs, and embryos such as "Baby Louie" - that not only were some dinosaurs warm-blooded, they brooded their nests much like a bird does today, and even continued to care for their hatchlings after birth.

What will we find out next? The possibilities are vast, and inspire further investigation by paleontologists and inquisitive third-graders alike. "The compelling thing about dinosaurs is how much tangible evidence we have to explore," says Phelan Fretz. "All of science is a puzzle, but this puzzle isn't limited to a microscope or a computer screen. You can really pick these pieces up in your hand and see if, and how, they fit together. 'Dinosaur Discoveries' will inspire meaningful ideas and questions about planet Earth and our connection to it - and that's what science is all about."

ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center is located at the Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, on Vermont's Burlington Waterfront. ECHO features 70 species of live fish, amphibians, invertebrates, and reptiles, over 100 hands-on experiences, major traveling exhibits, and the multimedia Awesome Forces Theater. The 2.2 acre site is also highlighted by the Lake Champlain Navy Memorial, ECHO's Eclectic Gift Shop, and seasonal café. Open year-round, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $7-$9.50; children under 3 and K-12 classroom teachers with credential ID are free. For more information visit echovermont.org, call 1-877-ECHOFUN, or write to ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, One College Street, Burlington, VT 05401.

©2014 LCBSC - ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center/Leahy Center for Lake Champlain - One College St. - Burlington VT 05401 - 1.877.324.6386
Directions Hours & Admission Blog E-Cards Jobs Volunteer Internships Press Room Contact Privacy Policy Terms of Use